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Which standard thickness Head Gaskets

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  • NeilR
    replied
    Yes, a Weber & NO oil leaks. Has to be a novelty !!

    Silicon Cam Cover Gaskets elimated the final leak, got extremely wound up with those carp cork things.
    Just need to decide about the very slight leek from the sump - been doing that for years, nearly since rebuild.
    Last edited by NeilR; 14 June 2021, 17:00.

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  • richardthestag
    replied
    Good Lord your engine must be healthy if you a running a weber and no oil leaks

    For head gaskets I would have thought anything that would lower the compression ratio slightly is going to help the older engines run sweeter on modern fuels. I would be inclined to stick with the thick gaskets and retorque for the first few hundred miles as normal.

    Back in the mid 1980s, I spent almost every weekend climbing over old wrecks at Atkinsons Breakers, Colliers Wood. Wonderful place and friendly guard dogs. Never stole any sparkplugs though, the warning signs were very clear what would happen to me if caught

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  • NeilR
    replied
    I does actually run much better now I have gone back to a Weber & altered the supplied jetting slightly to eliminate slight hesitancy at low speed light throttle.

    Got fed up with fiddling with those Strombergs (rebuilt) and does give better economy with the Weber.
    (relevant when doing over a thousand mile run at the begining of this month).

    No oil leaks, spent a lot of time eliminating those, only slight weep from the sump gasket, but not enough to warrant dropping it.

    Wrestling with oily bits has been my thing for 50 years - mainly when I'm bored.
    My kit car (Marlin Roadster), I built & had for 30 years, had 7 engines in it before I was happy with it, last time I will ever mess with a long stroke engine (Triumph 4 pot).
    Could never elimate startup rattle from crank - even after balancing (with pistons & flywheel & clutch), engine 7 nearly did.
    That was all from a time when real scrap yards existed ! and engines were "ten a penny".

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  • wilf
    replied
    I hate to say this, but your situation does seem to exemplify the art of fixing something that ain't broke. Your engine runs well, has great compression, doesn't leak - apparently?

    Of course, if you positively enjoy wrestling with the oily bits, but even so...........

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  • NeilR
    replied
    The existing have been retorqued a few times already. But I am not planning on doing anything about it until autumn anyway.
    I will be compression testing again before taking heads off.

    I shall look into BGA standard gaskets. Last one I bought, was suspiciously completely unbranded, never used it & it's still hanging on a woodscrew in the shed. Not saying who the supplier was for that.

    This engine is still standard bore, had never had a crank grind and the heads hadn't been skimmed.
    So it had a 1st crank grind 10thou, new standard pistons (county) & rings with a slight skim on the heads to clean them up.That was approx 22k miles ago. I have no idea of the real mileage the engine has covered.
    Last edited by NeilR; 9 June 2021, 22:18.

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  • flying farmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Motorsport Micky View Post
    I should forget about touching and just drop the water to below cylinder head/ block level, and undo the cylinder head nuts by 1 flat each ( removes Stiction) and then retorque the heads retook up with anti freeze mix. Carry on driving.

    Micky
    +1, the BGA gaskets compress a hell of a lot and need regular re-torquing for the first few thousand miles

    Neil

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  • Goldstar
    replied
    Originally posted by NeilR View Post
    I was intending to pull the engine for a rebore after the summer, but now I don't think I will.

    Just returned from an 1100 mile round trip which was based on 470 miles each way.
    Check oil level and it only took 400ml to top up to before I started. So don't think there can be a lot wrong with the bores & piston/rings.

    When last checked, a couple of months ago, compressions were around 140psi, all within about 5%.

    Both heads have been off in the last 3 years, RH earlier this year. In both cases I fitted BGA thick gaskets but did think at the time
    standard thickness could have been used.

    So, who supplies the best standard head gaskets, or are they all from the same supplier ?.
    Ask for the SOCTFL funded BGA gaskets - Abinger Hammer was the partner in the project but I expect most of the retailers will carry them. You'll get a members' discount with LD parts

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  • Motorsport Micky
    replied
    I should forget about touching and just drop the water to below cylinder head/ block level, and undo the cylinder head nuts by 1 flat each ( removes Stiction) and then retorque the heads in order retop up with anti freeze mix. Carry on driving.

    Micky
    Last edited by Motorsport Micky; 11 June 2021, 22:44.

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  • NeilR
    started a topic Which standard thickness Head Gaskets

    Which standard thickness Head Gaskets

    I was intending to pull the engine for a rebore after the summer, but now I don't think I will.

    Just returned from an 1100 mile round trip which was based on 470 miles each way.
    Check oil level and it only took 400ml to top up to before I started. So don't think there can be a lot wrong with the bores & piston/rings.

    When last checked, a couple of months ago, compressions were around 140psi, all within about 5%.

    Both heads have been off in the last 3 years, RH earlier this year. In both cases I fitted BGA thick gaskets but did think at the time
    standard thickness could have been used.

    So, who supplies the best standard head gaskets, or are they all from the same supplier ?.
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