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    Installing gearbox from underneath

    Last weekend I got engine in. This weekend I tackled the manual OD gearbox. It was the worst job and I'm still not done. If I every have to do it again, it will go in as one unit. Those bolts are a pain. I had all the bolts ready only to realize my parts book and RImmer site have the wrong length bolts listed. My son helped me and I told him if the car needs a new clutch play someone to do it.

    However, for those of you who have replaced your clutch,how did you go about doing it? Did u pull the engine and box out or just separate the box from underneath?
    Sujit

    #2
    Surely you put a clutch in as a matter of course Never put one in a Stag, but I guess the normal way would be with the engine in place unless of course the engine is already out.

    Rog S

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      #3
      I’ve done it twice working solo from underneath - I raise the front end on stands and manhandle the gearbox underneath onto a scissor jack when lifted the trans tunnel stops it falling off. However before you put the scissor jack in place put a oiled sheet of steel down. With this you can slide the box and control its height. I use some long bolts as guides - hold box aligned from 3” away. Once in place a couple of bolts hold it whilst I wrestle the rest.....

      Peter

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        #4
        Not the easiest job in the world but with the right sockets, wobble extensions and universal joints it can be done. One tip is to have someone inside the car with a rope or strop around the gearbox and through the gearstick hole to help take the weight while you engage the gearbox shaft thro' the clutch plate. Easier than removing the whole unit
        John
        1978 Stag Brooklands Green

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          #5
          I recently removed just the gearbox and J Type o/d to replace leaking gaskets and fitted new clutch, cross shaft etc. If I had to do it again, I would do it the same way and leave the engine in. It wasn't too bad a job (after researching and with kind advice from the forum) and as long as you have the right tools and plenty of 3/8" drive extensions with a bit of wobble to reach the bell housing bolts. I got new bell housing bolts from Rimmers and they were fine. I did the job on my own but the car was full height on a lift and I used a transmission jack.
          Regards
          Mark.

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            #6
            After struggling for many years balancing gearboxes on jacks I made an attachment to fit to my trolley jack.

            Worked perfectly in the shed, unfortunately when I designed it to balance the box I hadn't fitted the clutch thrust bearing and carrier, and the extra weight made it nose heavy so a touch of modification will be required before the next use
            Neil
            TV8, efi, fast road cams and home built manifolds. 246bhp 220lbft torque

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              #7
              Originally posted by Peter View Post
              I’ve done it twice working solo from underneath - I raise the front end on stands and manhandle the gearbox underneath onto a scissor jack when lifted the trans tunnel stops it falling off. However before you put the scissor jack in place put a oiled sheet of steel down. With this you can slide the box and control its height. I use some long bolts as guides - hold box aligned from 3” away. Once in place a couple of bolts hold it whilst I wrestle the rest.....

              Peter
              I can't imagine balancing the gearbox on a scissor stand, I was able to lift it with an atv lift. Next time II'll make a cradle out of wood to keep it from tipping over.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Markvh View Post
                I recently removed just the gearbox and J Type o/d to replace leaking gaskets and fitted new clutch, cross shaft etc. If I had to do it again, I would do it the same way and leave the engine in. It wasn't too bad a job (after researching and with kind advice from the forum) and as long as you have the right tools and plenty of 3/8" drive extensions with a bit of wobble to reach the bell housing bolts. I got new bell housing bolts from Rimmers and they were fine. I did the job on my own but the car was full height on a lift and I used a transmission jack.
                Regards
                Mark.
                The transmission jacks I see here in US mainly have a flat plate it sits on. It will work well on my BW35 but not for a manual.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by sujitroy View Post

                  The transmission jacks I see here in US mainly have a flat plate it sits on. It will work well on my BW35 but not for a manual.
                  Mine is the version with a flat plate (from Automotech). The plate also has adjustable sliders and uprights with chains to fasten around the gearbox. The plate angle is also adjustable to get the gearbox at the correct angle to slide the input shaft through the clutch splines and into the pilot bush. It really gave me full confidence working on my own. I think, if I had to remove the engine for some reason, I might remove the gearbox separatley first before removing the engine.

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                    #10
                    In my (younger) TR days I used to lie underneath with it on my chest and jiggle it in.. nowadays the thought of doing that makes my toes curl!!!
                    Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                    www.terryhunt.co.uk

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                      #11
                      as trunt has said last one I did was on stands and just man handled it out onto my chest with my knees under the tail shaft .....the good old days

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                        #12
                        I use a trolley jack and wooden props (lengths of old fence posts). When the gearbox is close to the engine, it doesn't needs props as it can't fall because of the bodywork around it. I make a bridge over the rear of the trolley jack with the wood, and a simple stack at the front, so on the way out, I can move back and lower till it rests on the wood Then just jack each end in turn while removing one block, so the box gradually lowers to the ground. Reverse process to get it back almost in place, then, as mentioned above, use long bolts where short ones should be to get an approximate alignment to the engine.
                        Don't forget to put it in gear (4th is best) before lifting into place, so you can rotate the input shaft with the rear flange to help it pass into the clutch.
                        All the nuts and bolts are fiddly, but manageable.
                        It can be frustrating. Last time I refitted the gear box, I spent about an hour and a half just trying to get the input shaft into the clutch and flywheel bush. However i wiggled it, it just didn't want to go. It was late afternoon, and I finally gave up and put some more wooden props under the box (so I wasn't relying on the trolley jack overnight). Next morning, i took the weight again on the trolley jack, and with one gentle push it slipped straight in. WHY WOULDN'T YOU DO THAT YESTERDAY, YOU **** GEARBOX!!
                        '72 Manual O/d Saffron Yellow

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                          #13
                          Picture when I removed my gearbox with a transmission jack and wooden packers. When installing it still helps to have an extra pair of hands. It certainly beats how I used to do it years ago with the car on the road outside my house on ramps, like Phil and Terry. Start on a Saturday morning and car has to be complete by Sunday night to go to work on Monday. Good for developing the neck muscles.

                          IMG_0077.jpg
                          John
                          1978 Stag Brooklands Green

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by JOHNS View Post
                            Picture when I removed my gearbox with a transmission jack and wooden packers. When installing it still helps to have an extra pair of hands. It certainly beats how I used to do it years ago with the car on the road outside my house on ramps, like Phil and Terry. Start on a Saturday morning and car has to be complete by Sunday night to go to work on Monday. Good for developing the neck muscles.

                            IMG_0077.jpg
                            Remember that scenario, John. We lived out in the country of the Scottish Borders and had 2 "quality" bangers between me and herself as our works were in opposite directions and no public transport. Saturday morning would be a quick strip to find what I might be missing, then a 26 mile round trip to the factors to pick up. Everything had to be serviceable for Mon morning, with all done by the side of the road in the wind/ rain/ snow/ blazing heat. Did everything except bodywork. I learnt the meaning of necessity being the mother of invention.

                            Was under a Hillman Imp when I first heard/ felt/ saw my first Stag burbling past. Think it was a BL placement car, lent to David Steel when he was leader of the Liberals and resulted in a long-term desire to have my own, one day.

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                              #15
                              Being in the business we have never taken an engine out of a Stag to fit either manual or auto boxes, of course with vehicle hoists it makes the job so much simpler.
                              Auto transmission rebuilding since 1979 - for my sins!

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