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Timing cams without flywheel

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  • flying farmer
    replied
    I can only assume the hole was moved so oil was sprayed on the chain before it met the rubber face of the tensioner. Someone once posted a video of the engine running with the timing chain cover removed which showed it very clearly.
    Just check the oil hole is clear because I know someone on here had a faulty one where the hole didn't go all the way through, though I can't remember if the post was related to this problem.

    I assume the change came after the manuals were printed, which is a problem likely to cause endless trouble in the future

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  • Ian928
    replied
    That is crazy! How many others have done this mistanke? There were no instructions with the tensioner telling that it needed to be adjusted with a bigger gap than the original ones. It is true, I saw the difference with the holes but failed to understand that they would be blocked when set by the manual. I also wondered why the spacer was thicker than 1mm, without seeing the reason.

    And, why did they redesign the oiling? Was it because of too much oil being slung around, making oil mist?

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  • flying farmer
    replied
    I made just this mistake with my second engine which fortunately was just bodged together out of 3 knackered ones while I rebuilt my first Stags engine following jackshaft failure.

    The first engine I built (for the TR) had oil holes in the tensioner face and I think the guidance at the time was to use 40 thou of feeler gauges as the setting between body and tensioner, and this one was fine until its first chain change at 40,000 miles
    The bodged together engine was stripped after 3000 miles to fit a reground crank (I had rebuilt my Stags original one) I found one chain and sprocket set were very badly worn by comparison with the other.

    I realised that one tensioner had the oil hole in the face, the worn one was in the stem so until the chain wore enough to let the tensioner pop out enough to uncover the hole it was running dry OOPS!!!

    This is why the new tensioners are supplied with a thick bit of red plastic as the spacer, they need a couple of mm

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  • Ian928
    replied
    These have the spray hole in the stem! So, that means they should be adjusted further out to allow oil to spray out of the hole? Sounds plausible, but not in line with the manual. That means I need to slacken the inner guide where I was able to adjust to 1mm clearance.

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  • flying farmer
    replied
    Are those the tensioners with the oil hole in the face?
    If they are they will go back a fraction more, whereas the ones with the spray hole in the stem need that much clearance so the spray hole isn't covered by the base of the tensioner.

    Neil

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  • Ian928
    replied
    A side note: The installed tensioner did not have the adjusters for the springs fitted. I wonder if that could have ended in disaster? I think maybe when everything gets worn, then on startup when there is no oil pressure the chains might be able to jump?

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  • Ian928
    replied
    Thank you, I will open up the adjuster! The heads are cut 1,5mm below minimum, the block was cut 0,3mm. I have added a 1,5mm Gosnay spacer and standard head gasket. Chains are «German» from Rimmer.

    And here is the picture i forgot to add earlier showing the tensioner and the adjuster at the maximum.
    66C5F8D4-C10C-42FA-9F5A-C8C878E2032F.jpeg

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  • sujitroy
    replied
    I had this problem earlier this year. I opened up the hole. that was the consensus of the folks on the forum

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  • flying farmer
    replied
    I have had this problem before on one engine. I had to extend the slot on the curved guide to get the chain tension correct.

    Don't know why I haven't come across it again as all my recent engines have had loads skimmed off the heads and block and standard head gaskets. All I can put it down to is the timing chains, I think the engine where I had to modify the chain guide was on cheap chains whereas the last two used jwis and the one before that "german" chains from Robsport.

    Neil

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  • Ian928
    replied
    Thank you, that was an easy solution!

    Now I have problem with the outer tensioner. I have adjusted The chain guide to the Max, but still there are more than 2mm gap between tensioner pad and Tensioner housing. See picture. I have made sure that the outer chain is the short one.

    Leave a comment:


  • sujitroy
    replied
    put a screw driver down plug hole and see where no. 2 reaches top. also temp. put cover on as a back up. the the life of me I could not find that mark on the flywheel

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  • jbuckl
    replied
    Set no. 2 to tdc . Use a dial gauge.
    If you can’t, temporarily fit the front cover, pulley & marker . Turn to tdc.
    Last edited by jbuckl; 23rd May 2020, 10:49.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ian928
    started a topic Timing cams without flywheel

    Timing cams without flywheel

    I did try to search!

    We have the engine on a stand without flywheel attached and are now about to assemble timing chains. We eyeballed no 2 at TDC to be able to put the heads on the block. We need some more accuracy before timing the engine. Are there any markings that can be used, or do we have to take the engine off the stand?
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