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  • ramjam2005
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldstar View Post

    It probably depends where and how extensive the repair is Alan. I had to repair the inner sill on one of my cars and as the repairs were not massive, it was easier to make.
    As Goldstar says..it depends on the extent of the repair. A few repairs for the bottom edge in opposed right angle bends will be realitively easy, even for the rear end I patched up.

    Like I mentioned in my first response on the thread, the extent of lost metal on the front inner on the right hand (off side) I previously tackled took ages and a pain to fabricate. You can see what I had to deal with from the photo attached of the left hand (near side) which I need to tackle next - rotten as a pear! For that reason, I'm planning to use the front section from the new inner sill I purchased decades ago so cost is negligible for me. Even if the initial fit is bad it gives me a good starting point which I can work with / improve.

    Ray


    Before10 copy.jpg

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  • Goldstar
    replied
    Originally posted by new to this View Post

    If it was me id make up repair sections for the inner sill , its a lot of work to fit a whole inner sill ,plus there dear to buy , and its a waist to cut up a sill just for the bottom edge

    Dave
    They also don’t fit very well apparently.

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  • Goldstar
    replied
    Originally posted by Fortyfiver View Post
    Hi Adrian
    what did you decide on? Cutting up a new inner sill or making your own plates, I’ve got the same decision now, any advice would be welcome.
    Alan
    It probably depends where and how extensive the repair is Alan. I had to repair the inner sill on one of my cars and as the repairs were not massive, it was easier to make.

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  • new to this
    replied
    Originally posted by Fortyfiver View Post
    Hi Adrian
    what did you decide on? Cutting up a new inner sill or making your own plates, I’ve got the same decision now, any advice would be welcome.
    Alan
    If it was me id make up repair sections for the inner sill , its a lot of work to fit a whole inner sill ,plus there dear to buy , and its a waist to cut up a sill just for the bottom edge

    Dave

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  • Fortyfiver
    replied
    Hi Adrian
    what did you decide on? Cutting up a new inner sill or making your own plates, I’ve got the same decision now, any advice would be welcome.
    Alan

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  • ramjam2005
    replied
    Originally posted by mole42 View Post
    The parts catalogue has four, early cars had three but even that seems to have been left out of the car quite early in the build sequence …
    I wonder if the inner sill was once a thinner gauge in combination with 4 or 3 layers and that's why it is now a heavier gauge compared to the outer sill. Maybe someone that has done a resto on an early body can answer that?

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  • mole42
    replied
    The parts catalogue has four, early cars had three but even that seems to have been left out of the car quite early in the build sequence …

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  • new to this
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldstar View Post
    I've never seen 4 pieces (but I've only repaired 4 cars tbh. LD152 which i had for a while, had 3
    Thats what made me ask never seen or heard of a four peace sill before

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  • Goldstar
    replied
    I've never seen 4 pieces (but I've only repaired 4 cars tbh. LD152 which i had for a while, had 3

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  • mole42
    replied
    Originally four pieces, see the Parts Catalogue for part numbers :-) Remember that the Stag is a shortened 2000 saloon with the roof chopped off. The saloon always had a three-piece sill and it also had a fixed roof as part of the structure. Stag probably relied on the T bar for structural support.
    As I wrote, the value engineers got at the Stag body and removed one sill strengthener, it has been said that later cars had the third sill part removed as well although I have no knowledge of that.

    Richard
    Last edited by mole42; 24th May 2020, 21:42.

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  • new to this
    replied
    Originally posted by mole42 View Post
    As Ray said above, it is worth remembering that the sill structure is a vital part of the strength of the shell. Also that the 'value engineers' at Triumph removed one of the layers of sill structure - the original cars had four sill panels, outer, inner and two strengthening pieces inside. Most restorations only replace the inner and outer sills and leave out the inner strengthener. It's also a good idea to replace the jacking point strengtheners!
    I always thought the early cars had a three peace sill , inner middle and outer , like the Dolomites

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  • ramjam2005
    replied

    I'd recommend the following to anyone delving into body restoration for the first time..As well as the Practical Classics restoration book, I also bought the EJ WARD body repair DVD to see how the professionals do it and get an idea of the tasks ahead and whether I felt confident enough to tackle them I'm not a professional welder nor a metal fabricator , all self taught and practiced on scrap panels well before I even went near the Stag.

    I'm going to do a complete body restoration so I'm fortunate enough to have the space to strip the car down to a just a bare body without any running gear or interior, plastics etc that could cause a fire ( nevertheless always got a fire extinguisher to hand !). This also removes a lot of the weight that could strain or deform the body when you start removing chunks of rusted panels out..I kept the front cross-member in place and the T bar to keep some rigidity. The body was well supported and levelled up across the front turrets and chassis rails, the underside chassis rails mid-way and the diff mounting points. I picked up some thick angle iron and small box section lentghs to form braces across the door apetures.

    Hopefully, when I restart the project soon I'll post pics etc in the relevant forum.
    Last edited by ramjam2005; 24th May 2020, 13:47.

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  • RogerS
    replied
    Did a lot of welding on a TR7 years back which had been wax oiled, was a nightmare, kept bursting into flame in concealed pockets. be careful and have an extinguisher to hand.

    Roger s

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  • Adrian B
    replied
    Thanks for your floor summery,very interesting,i think i will probably go for it and possibly have to do the front outrigger(previously bodged by the looks if it)!

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  • ramjam2005
    replied
    Originally posted by mole42 View Post
    As Ray said above, it is worth remembering that the sill structure is a vital part of the strength of the shell. Also that the 'value engineers' at Triumph removed one of the layers of sill structure - the original cars had four sill panels, outer, inner and two strengthening pieces inside. Most restorations only replace the inner and outer sills and leave out the inner strengthener. It's also a good idea to replace the jacking point strengtheners!
    Yes ...likewise I welded in new jacking point strengtheners to the outer sills before installing.

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