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    A bit of a coolant mess

    So, Yesterday when draining down the coolant system, I expected it to be blue as thats what I was told what was added last time. To my suprise, what came out was... well.. purple looking...

    This was worrying as, well, blue and red make ... Purple... More than that. there was gell rubbish in the expansion bottle...

    So this leaves me with a dilema.... I supose I should stick with the pink now its been added... but also I guess I should do some flushing. to make sure any trace of Blue has gone.

    I am wary of doing any form of chemical flushing as that may make matters worse. So whats the best next move.

    I was thinking of multiple fills of plain tap water followed by a final de-ionised water flush. Each time I would run the engine till its hot. Then finally refil with OAT at 33%.

    Does this seem reasonable? Is there a better choice?

    The radiator should not be an issue as it has a small leak, so its going away for repair, cleaning and pressure testing.

    Before writing this I read as many previous articles on the subject as I could find... it didn't really help as there seemsm to be an even split on going with blue or pink... but in general most say once pink is there leave it there.


    #2
    It does sound as though some clueless previous owner has mixed the two types. If it were my car I would flush thoroughly, by this I mean work through the system to ensure every part is flushed through with clean water - both ways. So remove heater hoses and connect hose pipe directly to the heater and flush. Remove the thermostat and refit the cover to allow uninhibited circulation, remove the block drain plugs. Use a hose pipe to force water through every pipe/hole both ways until it all runs clear. Then refit all pipes, plugs, fill with water, run up to temp, then drain and flush again until clear, refit thermostat & refil with coolant of your choice. My choice is Red OAT at 33%, I have used it in all my cars (modern and classic) for over 20 years. Always comes out as clean as it goes in and only needs to be changed every 5 or so years. Never seen any evidence of damage to gaskets or brass/solder. I live in a soft water area so I never worry about using D.I. water, I just use tap water.

    Roger
    White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
    So many cars, so little time!

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by marshman View Post
      It does sound as though some clueless previous owner has mixed the two types. If it were my car I would flush thoroughly, by this I mean work through the system to ensure every part is flushed through with clean water - both ways. So remove heater hoses and connect hose pipe directly to the heater and flush. Remove the thermostat and refit the cover to allow uninhibited circulation, remove the block drain plugs. Use a hose pipe to force water through every pipe/hole both ways until it all runs clear. Then refit all pipes, plugs, fill with water, run up to temp, then drain and flush again until clear, refit thermostat & refil with coolant of your choice. My choice is Red OAT at 33%, I have used it in all my cars (modern and classic) for over 20 years. Always comes out as clean as it goes in and only needs to be changed every 5 or so years. Never seen any evidence of damage to gaskets or brass/solder. I live in a soft water area so I never worry about using D.I. water, I just use tap water.

      Roger
      Thanks for your advice. Due to having to fix the heater, I have just finished flushing that. (Its valve was stuck shut.. now released and cable re-clpped back in place.

      I wil fully flush with water. Can you help me with something. How much water is left in the system after flushing? Has anybody worked that out? I ask as I want to end up with a 33/66% concentatration at the end. So to work out how much extra concentrate to add to the mixture to allow for water being in the system it would be good to know whats likely to be left in the system.

      I have access to DI water so lucky for me thats not a problem.



      Comment


        #4
        The cooling system holds 10.5 litres (18.5 pints) so for a 33% mix just add 3.5litres (just over 6 pints) of anti-freeze first then top up with water. The amount of water left in the system is irrelevant.

        Roger
        White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
        So many cars, so little time!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by marshman View Post
          The cooling system holds 10.5 litres (18.5 pints) so for a 33% mix just add 3.5litres (just over 6 pints) of anti-freeze first then top up with water. The amount of water left in the system is irrelevant.

          Roger
          Perfect... thanks

          Just removed the Thermostat housing only to find there is no Thermostat No wonder it took ages to heat up

          Comment


            #6
            Bad sign sorry to say
            There are 2 secrets to staying on top :- 1. Don't give everything away.
            2.

            Comment


              #7
              Make sure you fit the correct thermostat as there are two different types depending on the inlet manifold.( Mk1 or Mk 2 engine usually). Also check that it has a small air bleed hole in the outer rim. Without it you will have great difficulty in refilling the cooling system.
              Mike.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Lingen View Post
                Make sure you fit the correct thermostat as there are two different types depending on the inlet manifold.( Mk1 or Mk 2 engine usually). Also check that it has a small air bleed hole in the outer rim. Without it you will have great difficulty in refilling the cooling system.
                Mike.
                Yes I saw that on the LD site. Although he says its only marginal and will work anyway. Although I have an early Mk1, I thought I would try the one with a foots which seals off the bypass circuit as this makes more sense to me... I will monitor closely for performance. I could not tell what he meant by telling the difference.. i.e.

                early type of Manifold, identifiable by two undrilled blank topped pylons at the front

                Comment


                  #9
                  Just check there is enough depth behind the thermostat foot to allow it to open as it reaches working temperature if you are fitting it to a MK1 manifold. If the foot hits the back of the thermostat housing it might stop it from opening fully.
                  Neil
                  Neil
                  TV8, efi, fast road cams and home built manifolds. 246bhp 220lbft torque

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by flying farmer View Post
                    Just check there is enough depth behind the thermostat foot to allow it to open as it reaches working temperature if you are fitting it to a MK1 manifold. If the foot hits the back of the thermostat housing it might stop it from opening fully.
                    Neil
                    I thought the idea was for the foot to hit the back of the housing at operating temperatures, with the view that it seals the bypass hole at the back of the housing? So should I drop the housing into boiling water and then offer it into the housing to see what happens?

                    Dave

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Bakdraft007 View Post

                      I thought the idea was for the foot to hit the back of the housing at operating temperatures, with the view that it seals the bypass hole at the back of the housing? So should I drop the housing into boiling water and then offer it into the housing to see what happens?

                      Dave
                      The foot controls the bypass when using a Mk2 thermostat which has a foot, in a Mk2 manifold. You say that you’re using a Mk2 ‘stat possibly in a Mk1 manifold, hence Neil’s warning.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by KOY 23 View Post

                        The foot controls the bypass when using a Mk2 thermostat which has a foot, in a Mk2 manifold. You say that you’re using a Mk2 ‘stat possibly in a Mk1 manifold, hence Neil’s warning.
                        I was going of what they say on the LD site..

                        This has the foot and while it fits all Stags, some early inlet manifolds may function marginally better with a thermostat that does not have the foot.
                        I will order both JIC... I cannot say wether mine is earlt enough and an not sure how to tell ans as this stag didn't have a theremostat when I removed the gousing thats no clue either. The internal plumbing is the same for both Mk1 and K2 stags so I guess as long as its operates OK when hot it should be OK?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Look inside the manifold where the thermostat fits. If there is just an empty space, it is a MK 1 manifold, and will take the a simple thermostat with no spring loaded disc. If there is a hole cast in there about the size of a 10p piece, then it is a Mk 2 manifold, and will need the Mk 2, dual purpose type of thermostat. They are not interchangeable.
                          Mike.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Lingen View Post
                            Look inside the manifold where the thermostat fits. If there is just an empty space, it is a MK 1 manifold, and will take the a simple thermostat with no spring loaded disc. If there is a hole cast in there about the size of a 10p piece, then it is a Mk 2 manifold, and will need the Mk 2, dual purpose type of thermostat. They are not interchangeable.
                            Mike.
                            Hmmm So do I take it that I have a Mk2 due to the hole at the back see below..

                            IMG_1647.JPG
                            Which is a bit stange as I thought they all would have a hole there as its part of the bypass circuit that they both have... or is the hole for the bypass somewhere else?

                            My plan was to measure from the surface where the thermostat sits, then knowing that distance measure from the surface of the thermostat to the bottom of the foot when its cold then at 100 degrees and see how it would allow water to flow down the bypass hot and cold... does that sound OK?
                            Last edited by Bakdraft007; 14th January 2020, 20:17.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Not sure why this is so complicated. You have a MkII manifold, and so need the thermostat with the foot. Get the right 'stat from a decent Stag parts supplier, and fit it. End of that particular issue?

                              However, the system still needs a massive clear out to remove all traces of the gel formed by mixing the two types of antifreeze. The overheating caused by that is probably why the PO took the 'stat out to begin with.

                              You will have a nice clean rad when it comes back from reconditioning, fingers crossed the heater matrix isn't blocked. Not too difficult to disconnect its hoses, and get a hose pipe onto one of them and see what comes out of the other one.

                              And to answer your question about "how much water is left in after a flush?" You can get rid of most all of it by applying some compressed air into the thermostat housing, with the bottom hose disconnected. Not full pressure, but throttled down to 20psi or so will shift it all.

                              But in reality, if you can't do that, just refill first with 3.5 to 4 litres of neat antifreeze followed by water as Roger suggested, then you will end up with a 33%+ mix, it really isn't that critical.

                              Luck with your endeavours.
                              Header tanks - you can't beat a bit of bling.

                              Comment

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