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    Something for the painters out there

    I'm currently prepping the Stag for paint and have used some polyester primer/filler for the first time and thought I would share my experience so far.

    I have never used it before but people rave about it so thought I would try this time (This is my 4th full paint job) up until now I have done multiple-multiple coats of hi-build 2k.

    I'm using "Evercoat Featherfill G2" which is a little thinner than the Slicksand product and can be sprayed with a 1.8-2.2 nozzle (as I had a 2.0 and slicksand needs a bigger nozzle) It went on fine but the key is to filter the stuff BEFORE you mix in the hardener as its pretty time sensitive. I cannot stress this enough, I forgot this for the first test spray and it spat out lots of gobs, no matter how much you mix it has some chunks in it so definitely filter it..

    It went on pretty good, I upped the pressure a little, I normally use 25psi at the gun but upped it almost 30. You can only leave the stuff in the gun for 30 mins, so between coats I was running a little thinners through the gun to keep it clear but failed to clean the air ports and some buildup there caused me to struggle a bit towards the end... lesson learned.

    Coverage was just under Gallon for 2 coats of the whole exterior of the Stag, so I am planning on using 2 gallons/4 coats., Hopefully there will be enough spare to hit any problem areas with more if needed

    I Blocked the first 2 coats with 80 grade initially then 120 and will shoot another 2 coats tomorrow and re-block 120 and 180. It sands fine, you need to dry sand as it will absorb water. My usual practice is to shoot 2 coats of grey epoxy first and then a contrasting colour for the hi-build (In this case buff coloured featherfill) this way I can see when I'm getting down to the epoxy and need to stop. I will follow it with a couple of coats of 2k primer to seal it and another wet sanding before the topcoat.

    Terry
    Last edited by trunt; 25th September 2019, 15:30.
    Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

    www.terryhunt.co.uk

    #2
    Not many painters apparently but nonetheless..

    I had a couple of minor runs and some inevitable dirt nibs in the paint and was looking into easier ways to deal with them rather than razor blades and lots of sanding and came across a festool carbide scraper.

    https://www.festoolproducts.com/fest...SABEgI_c_D_BwE


    it’s pretty pricey for a 1 inch block of metal (50 odd quid?) but I must say I was impressed. It knocks off dirt nibs really well and leaves them perfectly flat. I even dropped a bit of paint in to one or two small defects and after drying they scraped perfectly flat. That was using it flat, for runs you use it on edge, the sides are perfectly flat the front is slightly curved. I didn’t push those too far but it brought them down to be nearly flat in short order and finished them with a hard block and 1500 grit.

    It took me a few practices to realise that you should not press to hard, it’s super sharp and will work with the lightest touch.

    So despite the price I would say it’s well worth it.
    Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

    www.terryhunt.co.uk

    Comment


      #3
      Certainly sounds like you know what you are doing Terry. Lack of input to your post is probably no from lack of interest but lack of knowledge. Ive only ever bare metal painted one car,my vitesse, with all the wrong equipment and no clue what i was doing. It came out ok after 10 rub downs anf recoats as i learnt on the job. Never again
      Carbs suck.

      Comment


        #4
        Yes not too many that crazy! My 4th, and at some point I always say never again.. it’s a heck of lot of work but once the car is done it’s a very satisfying achievement and I can say that It’s my own work.

        I doubt I will do another though, if I do maybe take it to blocked primer then have the final colour coat done professionally, conventional paint is getting scarce, my state has already banned its sale so I need to travel to PA to buy it and I think that eventually all will follow.

        Meanwhile colour sanding is in progress, I’m awaiting some more foam pads for my polisher as I’m eating them up!

        Terry

        Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

        www.terryhunt.co.uk

        Comment


          #5
          Terry
          please post some pictures of your hard work and progress.
          Cheers Glenn

          Comment


            #6
            OK,

            Here's the boot right after painting, then again after colour sanding. you can see the slight ragged edge to the light fixtures in the reflection on the before and how much sharper it is on the after. I did not have much orange peel at all but its always there to some extent. Once the panels are on the car I will go over them all again with the swirl remover and get them even better!


            boot1.JPG

            boot2.JPG
            Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

            www.terryhunt.co.uk

            Comment


              #7
              Here is an overview of all the loose panels, they have been colour sanded 1500 then down to 2000 grit and buffed and the wings are sanded ready for buffing, I'm eating the foam buffing pads up so had to order a few more... here on Friday. Meanwhile I am making friends with SWMBO again.

              Notice I repainted the garage floor, it was looking a bit Mallardy!

              panels1.JPG


              panels2.JPG
              panels3.JPG
              Last edited by trunt; 30th October 2019, 21:36.
              Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

              www.terryhunt.co.uk

              Comment


                #8
                Finally the Cool Tool, first pic is it being used to cut a nib, second one is a run on the left wing under the rear bumper mounting hole. It was running downwards and I have scraped it off. This tool would be great if you were touching up paint on a car, just fill the hole.scratch just proud with paint and use it to knock it back flat, 2000 grit and a buff and Bobs your mothers brother!

                I will post another pic of that area once its buffed..

                nib1.JPG

                nib3.JPG

                Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                www.terryhunt.co.uk

                Comment


                  #9
                  Nice work. I love it when you flat it down and then buff it up for the final finish. As you say doing it all yourself is very hard work and almost soul destroying at times but the finished product is always worth it, nothing like going into the garage next morning to look at your handiwork in the day light. (Occasionally finding some bug or insect has landed and done a death crawl in some conspicuous place)

                  How come you you are "eating" the foam buffing pads? Last couple of cars I have done (1960's Warwick GT and a MX5 Mk2) I think I got through no more than 2 per car. The thing that destroys them for me is catching them on a corner or edge when you lose concentration. I find I get on best with the "blue" ones which are quite soft. I did get some Farecla G3 that came with a free buffing pad but I found it too firm for my tastes and I could not get on with it so went back to what I was comfortable with. I have restored/resprayed around 12 cars over the years. Started using cellulose but for the last 13 or so years have used 2k paints, always with an airfed mask. Just so much easier, better coverage, better finish and much less shrinkage into filler repairs.

                  We are lucky in the UK, it is still relatively easy to get hold of any paint you want, cellulose, 2K etc. You just have to say it is for a classic car. If anything in recent years I have found it easier to get a massive range of "professional" product thanks to the internet (not just eBay!).

                  Keep up the reports!

                  Roger


                  White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                  So many cars, so little time!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks Roger,
                    I did have a single bug, I think he was attempting the backstroke - At least not the swarm of flying ants I got on my first car, I'm pretty sure the thinners actually attract them!

                    I'm using an electric Random orbit polisher, Safer than a rotary one, I'm not going to burn through with that but it needs much more time to work the surface. Whats happening is the center is getting really hot and melting the foam from the back of the pad. I guess I need to give it a rest to cool down more often. Also use 2k paints, This was PPG DCC single stage, expensive stuff but lays down wonderfully, and yes an air fed respirator, as I said my state whilst not actually banning the use, do ban the sale of it. My first car was done with clear over base but since then I prefer the single stage for the ease of applying.
                    Last edited by trunt; 30th October 2019, 23:38.
                    Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                    www.terryhunt.co.uk

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thank You For The updates nice to see and what the cool tool can do. looking forward to seeing the after shots.
                      Cheers Glenn

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by trunt View Post
                        Thanks Roger,
                        I did have a single bug, I think he was attempting the backstroke - At least not the swarm of flying ants I got on my first car, I'm pretty sure the thinners actually attract them!

                        I'm using an electric Random orbit polisher, Safer than a rotary one, I'm not going to burn through with that but it needs much more time to work the surface. Whats happening is the center is getting really hot and melting the foam from the back of the pad. I guess I need to give it a rest to cool down more often. Also use 2k paints, This was PPG DCC single stage, expensive stuff but lays down wonderfully, and yes an air fed respirator, as I said my state whilst not actually banning the use, do ban the sale of it. My first car was done with clear over base but since then I prefer the single stage for the ease of applying.
                        I was always told not to let the foam pad get too warm, let alone hot as you risk damaging the paint. I have a pressurised garden sprayer full of clean water handy and keep the surface wet whilst buffing. Its messy but works for me and no ruined foam pads. I wet the surface with the sprayer, smear a "dollop" of G3 over the section I am working on, then work up and down with the buffer. Stopping to wet the surface occasionally. I find that once most of the G3 has "dissappeared" a quick, light pass with the buffer at high speed dries the surface off leaving a mirror like finish. My buffer is a standard on with no random orbit,
                        https://www.sealey.co.uk/product/563...peed-1300w230v

                        White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                        So many cars, so little time!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          No damage to the paint, the working surface of the pad is fine and I damaged. It it just starts to loose it’s support in the middle and kinda collapses. Pretty sure the heat is coming from the tool, not friction on the paint surface.

                          I will go a bit slower and give it a rest every 6 passes or so and see how things go.

                          terry
                          Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                          www.terryhunt.co.uk

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Ah that makes more sense, heat from the motor and gearbox (if there is one), couldn't work out how you weren't damaging the paint if the foam was getting warm enough to be damaged! I had noticed that my pads got warm if I didn't keep things damp. Must admit I am not scared to go quite hard - (hard being a relative term) - on the paint to buff it up, I just ease off near panel edges. When I first started I was scared of rubbing through the paint, especially before it had fully hardened, but practice makes perfect as they say.

                            Roger
                            White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                            So many cars, so little time!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Finished the colour sanding tonight, turning the speed 1 stop down from max on the tool stopped the heat problem, it stopped eating the pads.

                              This is where I start to remember why I do all this work, a little selfie from the front wing, who needs selfie mode eh?

                              IMG_2781.JPG

                              Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                              www.terryhunt.co.uk

                              Comment

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