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    Petrol smells in boot and car

    What are the potential cause of petrolly smells in the boot and occasionally detectable in the car? Is it poor/blocked venting and if so, where? Or is it old fuel lines that need replacing and, if so, what is the recommended type to use?
    As always, your help would be appreciated.
    Paul
    Mk 2 1975 TV8 Mimosa

    #2
    What type of fuel pump do you have and how old?

    My SU pump recently had to be rebuilt to restore output as internal seals were suffering from E5 fuel, and one symptom, now that I think about it, was fuel smells.
    Header tanks - you can't beat a bit of bling.

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      #3
      Paul - it could be the tank itself (underneath) - had the same problem last year, and on removing the tank saw there was a small hole forming.
      Managed to get it welded locally (in Tenerife) and it's been fine since.
      Terry (home - Los Cristianos) ~ (YouTube site - "Tenerife Terry" to see uploaded videos)

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        #4
        My petrol in the boot smells were caused by the fibre washers on the replacement pump needing tightening (they weren't exactly leaking but they were moist upon removal which was obviously petrol).
        I love deadlines - I like the whooshing sound they make as they pass by!

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          #5
          I am just in the process or replacing all the fuel pipes in the boot of my Stag, as I could smell fuel, but could not find any leaks.
          I eventually found a split in the main rubber fuel filler pipe at the T-connection for the return pipe, I was not expecting that.
          The split was not obvious until I removed the tank return pipe itself.
          I have a MkI with the longer filler neck on the fuel tank and so I have had to cut-down a MKII fuel filler hose to make it fit, as the MKI version is no longer available.
          My original fuel pipes were the braided type and looked quite old, but did not seem to be leaking.
          I read that vent pipes could go hard and leak, but mine seemed to be OK, I think they had been replaced at some point.
          I am replacing all fuel and vent pipes with SAEJ30R rated pipes, just to be safe.
          Den

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            #6
            Its just the Stag warning not to fill with diesel

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              #7
              Paul. Something to check.
              The stag shares the same fuel tank as the Triumph 2.5PI estate, so comes with an extra pipe that was there for the return of excess fuel from the injectors. This was blanked off with a simple rubber cap and pipe clip. This has probably been replaced by now with a short length of fuel hose with a small bolt or something on the end to seal it. This might have perished.
              You will be able to see if it is leaking by lifting the boot floor over the tank.
              Mike.

              Comment


                #8
                Mine was the banjo joints fitted to the new pump, the fibre washers were not doing the job properly and fuel was seeping out the join.
                71 TV8
                68 NGTCV8

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by bullstarz View Post
                  Its just the Stag warning not to fill with diesel
                  unless you have one of the diesel conversions, oh yeah 1.8 litre diesel conversion

                  https://www.howmanyleft.co.uk/family...h_stag#!engine

                  And to think folk moaned about electric conversions mind you there is one 10000cc and over!! Merlin powered Stag? what could possibly go wrong

                  Petrol smell, start cheap and easy, work your way up to hauling out the tank as a last resort

                  It won't take a lot of spilled fuel or a particularly big hole to smell pretty bad. Unleaded smells unpleasant compared to good ol 4 star

                  If it only smells after filling up, likely that the blank plug on top of the tank has worn out, thus tank is venting into the boot area and into the car via the inner wings.

                  Smells all the time, check fuel sender on top of tank is sealed properly, general hose tightness and banjo joints on pump. I had a pump leak actually on the body of the pump where is sandwiches the diaphragm.

                  if Ok, slip a copy of one of the tabloids between tank and boot floor, does it come back damp?

                  Dry tank bottom doesn't mean that it is not holed above the usual fuel level line and thus vapour will leak out and not petrol. = more dangerous.

                  Tank out and pressure check will confirm tank health, small pin hole could be sealed up with one of the tank sealer kits. I used the product with good success.

                  https://youtu.be/9XBRGIpzIbA

                  rust.co.uk
                  SLOSH ETHANOL RESISTANT PETROL TANK - SEAL

                  Good luck
                  Stags and Range Rover Classics - I must be a loony

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ah, thanks very much to all of you for the suggestions. I have some time over the weekend so will work through the possibilities, starting with the easier ones as suggested. I'll report back when I know more.
                    Paul
                    Mk 2 1975 TV8 Mimosa

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I can confirm what Lingen suggested, mine was short rubber pipe with a bung in it.
                      Ray

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                        #12
                        I've now had a chance this morning to investigate further. The garage stank of petrol vapour never mind the car! There is fuel in the boot well seemingly coming from under the tank. I've checked all the visible and reachable seals and can't see any obvious problems or feel any fuel dripping down, so it's looking like it is coming from the tank. My 'go to' mechanic is coming round on Monday to give a more professional opinion and we'll go from there. I'm still hoping it's a seal or fuel line but if it is the tank then I'll look at the options. Rimmers have a new tank for 450 inc VAT so I'll be looking at repair options first. Norther Radiator Group (NRG) - used them before - offer a classic tank repair service, for example. I'll post more when I know.
                        Paul
                        Mk 2 1975 TV8 Mimosa

                        Comment


                          #13
                          As I said in my first post, in my case it was the underneath of the tank, but rather than replace it (because I am in Tenerife), I got it welded and they did a really good job and didn't charge a lot - might be worth you enquiring about doing similar, depends on how bad it is, mine was just a pinprick hole.
                          Terry (home - Los Cristianos) ~ (YouTube site - "Tenerife Terry" to see uploaded videos)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Kelley View Post
                            I've now had a chance this morning to investigate further. The garage stank of petrol vapour never mind the car! There is fuel in the boot well seemingly coming from under the tank. I've checked all the visible and reachable seals and can't see any obvious problems or feel any fuel dripping down, so it's looking like it is coming from the tank. My 'go to' mechanic is coming round on Monday to give a more professional opinion and we'll go from there. I'm still hoping it's a seal or fuel line but if it is the tank then I'll look at the options. Rimmers have a new tank for 450 inc VAT so I'll be looking at repair options first. Norther Radiator Group (NRG) - used them before - offer a classic tank repair service, for example. I'll post more when I know.
                            Paul
                            If you end up removing the tank you can save a lot of hassle by using the electric fuel pump to drain most of the tank into a container using a pipe connected to the engine bay fuel filter (disconnect the coil +ve first and switch on the ignition). You can measure the fuel flow rate at the same time by timing how long to fill a 1 litre container. Pump on/off switch (inertia switch) is also conveniently nearby when doing this.
                            Simon

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Paul.
                              Although using the fuel pump is the obvious way to get the tank almost empty, I would get the level as low as possible first. I think there might be a risk of the pump overheating if it was left running flat out for
                              too long. Keep an eye (hand?) on it just in case.
                              Mike.

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