Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Coolant diversion mod

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Thanks chaps, I'll start looking for a tee piece. Interesting stuff all round.

    Mark
    Sometimes you just need the 2 wheels!

    Comment


      #17
      Some time ago I checked 6 cars after a motorway run and all apart from one were around 10c hotter at the rear of the right head.
      The one actually had equal temps although I don't know that it meant a lot as he had problems with hgf some time later.

      Pete

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by DJT View Post
        Hi Drew. I would have thought that your engine should run 'cool'. After all, not only did you clean out all the casting sand and decades of corrosion from block and heads, but you built it with more care and attention to detail than most were at the factory. If they had all been built like that, there would be no such thing as 'Stag Paranoia'....
        But if there was NO STAG PARANOIA, what would we have to do in the evenings
        73 mk 1/2 now gone to the dark side BLUE

        Comment


          #19
          Go on the forum and wind members up by asking questions, getting sensible answers, then telling them to mind there own business, THEN get the backing of some other members.
          I only do what the voices in my wife’s head tell me to do!

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by dasadrew View Post
            Just measured the temperature between LH (where original temperature sender was) and RH (where my capillary gauge take-off is) transfer housings and it is 7°C.

            If I look at the temperature range of the Smiths dual gauge (mine is just a C-N-H one, but the scale is probably the same for the degrees °C one), then the 7°C effect of fitting it on the RH housing compared to the LH housing would more than place the needle on the right side of the "N"!

            Looks like I've got a cool Stag after all! (could have saved the money for the Revotec!)

            [ATTACH=CONFIG]41676[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]41677[/ATTACH]















            So if the car over heats,does it also damage the capillary tube gauge as well ?
            Last edited by new to this; 23rd August 2017, 22:08.
            73 mk 1/2 now gone to the dark side BLUE

            Comment


              #21
              I suppose that depends on what is meant by overheating and what the materials used are!

              Drew
              If you can't say something nice, don't say it !

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Jeff View Post
                Go on the forum and wind members up by asking questions, getting sensible answers, then telling them to mind there own business, THEN get the backing of some other members.
                Do you mean being grumpy old men
                73 mk 1/2 now gone to the dark side BLUE

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by dasadrew View Post
                  I suppose that depends on what is meant by overheating and what the materials used are!

                  Drew

                  Drew

                  You've lost me a bit there ?
                  What i wanted to know was if the car over heated got really hot would it damage the capillary tube ?
                  73 mk 1/2 now gone to the dark side BLUE

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by new to this View Post

                    Drew

                    You've lost me a bit there ?
                    What i wanted to know was if the car over heated got really hot would it damage the capillary tube ?
                    Suppose it might depend on the temperature experienced. Mine must have gone well above the 110C max when I had a problem with my Kenlowe - had just been caning it up a long incline on the motorway and it was hard on 110C when I stopped, so with heat soak it must have been around the 120C mark. Feared for HGF, but got away with it. What I can say is that the Temp gauge (capillary type) seems to have suffered no detriment.

                    Jonno

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by StagJonno View Post
                      Suppose it might depend on the temperature experienced. Mine must have gone well above the 110C max when I had a problem with my Kenlowe - had just been caning it up a long incline on the motorway and it was hard on 110C when I stopped, so with heat soak it must have been around the 120C mark. Feared for HGF, but got away with it. What I can say is that the Temp gauge (capillary type) seems to have suffered no detriment.

                      Jonno
                      Haven't you got a viscous fan?

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Ok, thanks Dave.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by DJT View Post
                          Hi Drew. I would have thought that your engine should run 'cool'. After all, not only did you clean out all the casting sand and decades of corrosion from block and heads, but you built it with more care and attention to detail than most were at the factory. If they had all been built like that, there would be no such thing as 'Stag Paranoia'....
                          Thanks for those kind words Dave (I'll give you the £10 when we next meet )
                          If you can't say something nice, don't say it !

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by StagJonno View Post
                            Suppose it might depend on the temperature experienced. Mine must have gone well above the 110C max when I had a problem with my Kenlowe - had just been caning it up a long incline on the motorway and it was hard on 110C when I stopped, so with heat soak it must have been around the 120C mark. Feared for HGF, but got away with it. What I can say is that the Temp gauge (capillary type) seems to have suffered no detriment.

                            Jonno
                            Jonno

                            thanks,thats what i was hoping to hear the Temp gauge capillary tube was still ok,i have one to fit the stag,but have modifiy the head back plate on the sprint to take one

                            thanks Dave
                            73 mk 1/2 now gone to the dark side BLUE

                            Comment


                              #29
                              The temperature sender capillary and bulb are soldered together, so to damage them you would have to melt the solder. I suspect the engine might have seized up before that temperature was reached?

                              What might happen to the instrument itself if very high temps were reached is probably of more concern, there is a small metal "bellows" in there that expands and contracts to move the needle, I guess that could be more easily damaged.
                              Header tanks - you can't beat a bit of bling.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by KOY 23 View Post
                                Haven't you got a viscous fan?
                                Yes, but it's in the attic - remove one point of failure - introduce another one! My mech hadn't realised that it was a ballasted coil (Mk2 wire in the loom type) and had used a pickup from the coil to feed the relays. It's a 2-speed and I think the Lo Speed relay must have dropped off whilst the Boost connection was still energised, causing the main power fuse to blow. Easily sorted.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X