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How accurate is your original Kienzle clock?

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    How accurate is your original Kienzle clock?

    My Kienzle clock has been loosing about 5 minutes per day. While the stag is still in its winter hibernation I have removed it, cleaned the inside and have it running on the bench. I am going through the process of tweaking the adjustment screw and resetting every day to improve its accuracy.

    My question is how accurate can these clocks get? If I could get to a minute per week I would be happy but I don't know if this is achievable.

    Mark.

    #2
    Mine gains about 5 mins a day, Always has.

    Comment


      #3
      Some would say that if it's working at all you have a winner. Others say the clocks are correct twice a day.....

      I rebuilt my clock, since when it's more or less right if I leave the battery connected, but if I unscrew the negative terminal and supply the clock only through the 10A fuse it runs about 10mins a day slow.

      Richard
      Mabel is a white 1972 Mk1˝, TV8, ZF 4HP-22 auto,
      2016 RBRR finisher. 400 mile C2C 21/22 April 2018!

      Comment


        #4
        Mark
        By coincidence I started my Stag today for the first time since early October, and found the clock to be just over 15 minutes slow. A minute a week is achievable. These are mechanical clocks with an electrically powered winder. They are not dependant on delivery of constant voltage. As the spring winds down it makes a contact, the little motor winds the clock and then trips out. Mine is on about ten minuter per cycle.
        Brian
        Brian

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          #5
          Thanks all for the replies. So Brian has laid down the challenge, 3 minutes per month!

          Its interesting that you say your solenoid fires every 10 minutes, mine is more like 3. Like one of the earlier replies, I guess I should be thankful that it's working at all.

          Will keep on tweaking......

          Comment


            #6
            Such an awful inaccurate clock who in heavens name made them

            Comment


              #7
              My clock has packed up, soon to be relplaced by an oil pressure gauge

              Comment


                #8
                Brian. Interesting. The ones I have work differently. There is no spring mechanism, but there is a tiny electromagnet to keep the escapement oscillating, and a contact that powers it for a fraction of a second with each oscillation. The trouble is that the points wear away eventually, so it stops. It was reasonably accurate till I replaced it with an oil pressure gauge.
                Mike.

                Comment


                  #9
                  One of the problems is temperature variation. Most clocks and watches with a balance spring are either in a house sitting roughly at room temperature or in the case of an old wristwatch on your wrist where your body heat keeps the temperature fairly constant. The temperature in a car varies a lot. If outside in the winter it can easily drop below freezing and then on a run will get quite warm tucked up in the dash. If you use the car on a daily basis so that the average temperature stays fairly constant then the regulator can be adjusted to get reasonable long term accuracy. Leave it laid up all week or month or longer and the temperature varies with the weather much more, it's not getting a daily boost from a run, so the accuracy can suffer. The other thing is the clocks can be 40 years old and dirt, corosion and tired springs can make a difference.

                  Cleaning the switch contacts can help, if they are dirty it may make the winding process cut in later or at a variable time. As the spring winds down its torque reduces and can have an effect on the time accuracy so reliable winding at the same point is also a factor in the accuracy.

                  If you want an accurate clock then may be get the quartz inards out of a small clock and graft them into the original housing.

                  Roger
                  White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                  So many cars, so little time!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by marshman View Post
                    One of the problems is temperature variation. Most clocks and watches with a balance spring are either in a house sitting roughly at room temperature or in the case of an old wristwatch on your wrist where your body heat keeps the temperature fairly constant. The temperature in a car varies a lot. If outside in the winter it can easily drop below freezing and then on a run will get quite warm tucked up in the dash. If you use the car on a daily basis so that the average temperature stays fairly constant then the regulator can be adjusted to get reasonable long term accuracy. Leave it laid up all week or month or longer and the temperature varies with the weather much more, it's not getting a daily boost from a run, so the accuracy can suffer. The other thing is the clocks can be 40 years old and dirt, corosion and tired springs can make a difference.

                    Cleaning the switch contacts can help, if they are dirty it may make the winding process cut in later or at a variable time. As the spring winds down its torque reduces and can have an effect on the time accuracy so reliable winding at the same point is also a factor in the accuracy.

                    If you want an accurate clock then may be get the quartz inards out of a small clock and graft them into the original housing.

                    Roger
                    Thanks Roger, it seems like I maybe flogging a dead horse on this one. It does demonstrate that our cars have never been more reliable. All I have to worry about these days is the clock. I was touching wood and had everything crossed when I typed that!!!!!!!!!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Might be worth opening it up to get an idea of its general condition and to see if you can clean the contacts. I would have thought you should be able to get to a couple of minutes per week with careful adjustment, assuming the contacts are ok.

                      Roger.
                      White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                      So many cars, so little time!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Mines absolutely spot on ......twice a day.

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                          #13
                          It is one of those things where "they" got it wrong. I've got an oil pressure gauge where the clock should be and a Holdens "Smiths" clock where the ash-tray should be.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            So thanks to this thread I went down to the garage and got an old Kienzle clock off of the shelf. It never worked so I thought I would take it apart to see what makes it tick, or not.

                            I'll post some pics later but to cut a long story short there is a short link wire to the solonoid which wasn't there. Now it either corroded, the solder was really grey and powdery, or it had blown like a fuse. Any way soldered in a new link wire and away it went.

                            The clock rewinds itself every three minutes. The whole process took less than 30 minutes including taking pics which I'll post tomorrow.

                            Time will tell how good it is at keeping time

                            Now I can get rid of that oil pressure gauge!

                            Roger
                            White TV8 BW35 no mods and now a Dolly Sprint to keep it company
                            So many cars, so little time!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by marshman View Post
                              So thanks to this thread I went down to the garage and got an old Kienzle clock off of the shelf. It never worked so I thought I would take it apart to see what makes it tick, or not.

                              I'll post some pics later but to cut a long story short there is a short link wire to the solonoid which wasn't there. Now it either corroded, the solder was really grey and powdery, or it had blown like a fuse. Any way soldered in a new link wire and away it went.

                              The clock rewinds itself every three minutes. The whole process took less than 30 minutes including taking pics which I'll post tomorrow.

                              Time will tell how good it is at keeping time

                              Now I can get rid of that oil pressure gauge!

                              Roger
                              I have an really good one ( it doesn't work ) but looks pretty
                              I have a really excellent copy that's missing the second hand and it keeps excellent time. I would still like to put the original back one day. A little insight would be very interesting.

                              Comment

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